Alain Campbell White Letters to Frederick Gamage

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Author: White, Alain Campbell (1880-1951) signed

Year: 1935-1944

Publisher: Self Written

Place: Summerville, Littchfield and New York

Description:

Alain Campbell White letters to Frederick Gamage cover the years from April 4, 1935 to September 15, 1944. For this ten year period there are 364 dated letters and 28 incomplete letters (lacking front date page). The letters are an ongoing correspondence between White and Gamage which covers all aspects of problem chess. The letters show a development of mentor (White), encouraging ad occasionally prodding his protégé (Gamage) in developing skills in problem construction. As the letters progress over this ten year period, the reader can observe the relationship develop between the two men, from a formal intercourse to a more comradely banter. White offered suggestions, comments and themes for problems. White’s vast and profound technical knowledge, his artistic appreciation, his ability in expressing himself, and his enthusiastic and friendly encouragement were the great inspiration of many problems Gamage constructed, and he was lucky enough to be among his host of correspondents. Some of the letters were multiple pages hand typed, but often hand written, some unsigned or just initialed, usually with the location White was residing and the date written. Included with the letters are the limited edition work by Alain White on Gamage Frederick Gamage: An Artist in Chess Problems and Mike Prcic’s book Frederick Gamage. The letters in the latter work have been reproduced from the original letters offered now.

Newman Guttman was one of a few problemists to visit Frederick Gamage. After the passing of Gamage, the letters from Alain White along with Gamage’s other chess papers were given to Guttman. He, in turn, gave these papers to Edgar Holladay. Holladay came into the possession of what problemists would consider as “treasures,” one-of-a-kind items from famous and well-known problemists. Robert Moore and Holladay were good friends and these were passed to him by Holladay’s wife, Rita.

Serious buyers may inquire about more information regarding this collection.

Condition:

The letters have folds for postage, some occasional stains, and occasional edge wear else a very good collection. They are housed in individual archival holders held in a multiple three ring binders.