AVRO 1938 International Chess Tournament
AVRO 1938 International Chess Tournament
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AVRO 1938 International Chess Tournament

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Author: Sherwood, Robert and Dale Brandreth

Year: 2010

Publisher: Caissa Editions

Place: Yorklin, Delaware

Description:

xxxvii+167+[4 ad] pages with diagrams, tables, illustrations and bibliography. Royal octavo (9 1/4" x 6") issued in original red cloth with gilt lettering to spine and front cover. Errata laid in. First American edition.

The AVRO Chess Tournament of 1938, sponsored by the Dutch broadcasting company, Algemeene Vereeniging Radio Omroep, was a valiant effort to provide a challenger to Alexander Alekhine. The official opening of the A.V.R.O tournament took place on Saturday evening, November 5th at the Amstel Hotel in Amsterdam. No games were played until the next day, with the evening devoted to opening ceremonies, speeches and drawing lots for the schedule of rounds. The hall was decorated with the national flags of the participating masters' countries. All players were present except for Capablanca, who was represented by tournament director Salo Landau. Mr G de Clercq, president of A.V.R.O, opened the ceremonies with a speech of welcome and stated that his company was very proud to have brought together such a brilliant array of masters. Dr Euwe, on behalf of the players, thanked him, praised the organization of the tournament, and hoped that the quality of the play would prove that all the players were worthy of the honor of participating in the tournament. The Dr Alekhine spoke. He stated that all sorts of rumors were being circulated to the effect that the winner of this tournament would have preference over all others in arranging a match with him for the world championship. These rumors presumable originated because of his contract with the A.V.R.O, in which he agreed to play the winner under conditions to be formulated later. He stated that he retained, however, the right to first play for the world title with others and that the A.V.R.O contract clause had not created new rights and preferences. He placed himself on record as believing that a tournament, no matter how strong the players, cannot be a preponderant factor in deciding the question of the world championship. After the speeches the drawing of lots took place. Each player was addressed in his own language by a young girl garbed in the appropriate national costume of his country and was given a bouquet of flowers.(AVRO 1938).

Condition:

A fine copy issued without jacket.