Das Großmeister-Turnier  (Großmeister-Turnier) im Kerkau-Palast zu Berlin im Oktober 1918
Das Großmeister-Turnier  (Großmeister-Turnier) im Kerkau-Palast zu Berlin im Oktober 1918
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Das Großmeister-Turnier (Großmeister-Turnier) im Kerkau-Palast zu Berlin im Oktober 1918

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Author: Kagan, Bernhard (1866-1932)

Year: 1919

Publisher: Verlag von Bernhard Kagan

Place: Berlin

Description:

20 pages. Octavo (8 1/2" x 5 1/2") bound in original publisher;s stiff boards. (Bibliotheca Van der Linde-Niemeijeriana: 5329) First edition.

The Schachjahrbuch declares the "Grandmaster Tournament of Berlin 1918" to have been not only the most important in Germany, but in the world! It brought together the four foremost players of the period: Lasker, Rubinstein, Schlechter and Tarrasch. Like it predecessor a few months earlier, the tournament was organized by Kagan and played out in the Cafe Kerkau. Cafe sponsors provided an unusual first-place prize: 1000 cigarettes made of the finest tobacco! It is matter-of-factly recorded by Bachmann that the cigar-smoking Lasker greatly enjoyed his valued prize in view of the tobacco shortage plaguing German during the closing months of the war. The story of the tournament is quickly told: world champion Lasker, appearing in his first tournament since St Petersburg 1914, and Rubinstein recovering from his disastrous form of April, made the running between them. Lasker (+3-0=3) edged his Warsaw rival (+2-0=4) by half point in the final two rounds. Rubinstein's regaining of his stride can be seen in two hard fought draws with Lasker (the champion had to exercise care in both contests) and his plus scores against both Schlechter (+0-2=4) displayed a marked nervousness in his play. Acclaimed in the prewar period for his correct and safe style, he later developed a strong predilection for sharp attacking lines - while at the same time being prone to the contradictory practice of offering and accepting early draws! The 30th move held a fateful significance for Schlechter in the second Berlin event. He experienced great good luck against Rubinstein in the fifth round when, in time pressure, his taciturn opponent overlooked the win of Schlechter's Queen on his 30th move. In the following round the faltering Schlechter, facing Lasker, miscalculated on his 30th turn to throw away a practical drawing chance. (Goldman: Carl Schlechter!, Caissa Editions)

Condition:

Edge wear, some foxing to front board, pages age toned else a very good copy.