Moscow International ChessTournament 1961 (Score Sheet)
Moscow International ChessTournament 1961 (Score Sheet)
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Moscow International ChessTournament 1961 (Score Sheet)

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Author: Portisch, Lajos (1937- ) and Eduard Yefimovich Gufeld signed

Year: 1961

Publisher: USSR Chess Federation

Place: Moscow

Description:

1 page.(10 1/2" x 5 1/4") Original hand written score of the game between Lajos Portisch (white) and Eduard Gufeld (in Portisch's hand) ending in a 20 move draw. Signed by each player.


Lajos Portisch (born 4 April 1937 in Zalaegerszeg, Hungary) is a Hungarian chess Grandmaster, whose positional style earned him the nickname, the "Hungarian Botvinnik". One of the strongest non-Soviet players from the early 1960s into the late 1980s, he participated in twelve consecutive Interzonals from 1962 through 1993, qualifying for the World Chess Championship Candidates' cycle a total of eight times (1965, 1968, 1974, 1977, 1980, 1983, 1985, and 1988). Portisch set several all-time records in chess Olympiads. In Hungarian Chess Championships, he either shared the title or won it outright a total of eight times (1958, 1959, 1961, 1964, 1965, 1971, 1975, and 1981). He won many strong international tournaments during his career. In 2004, Portisch was awarded the 'Nemzet Sportoloja', Hungary's highest national sports achievement award. He still competes Eduard Yefimovich Gufeld (March 19, 1936, Kiev, Soviet Union - September 23, 2002) was a Ukrainian International Grandmaster of chess, and a chess author. By the late 1950s he established himself as one of the strongest players in the world. He defeated Tal, Spassky, Smyslov, Korchnoi, Bronstein, and just about every other strong Soviet player. Gufeld played in his first chess tournament in 1953 at the age of 17. He became the junior champion of Ukraine at the age of 18. He became an International Master in 1964, and became an International Grandmaster in 1967. In 1977 his Elo rating was 2570, and ranked 16th in the world. He was also a trainer who moved to Tbilisi, the Republic of Georgia, and lived there for more than a decade, and coached Maia Chiburdanidze, who became the youngest women's world chess champion in 1978. After the fall of the Soviet Union, he emigrated to the USA.

Condition:

Sheet is beginning to darken at edges, edge wear with some small closed tears else a very good copy.