Die Schacholympiade von Hamburg. Erinnerungen an die Landerkampfe der F.I.D.E. 1930
Die Schacholympiade von Hamburg. Erinnerungen an die Landerkampfe der F.I.D.E. 1930
Die Schacholympiade von Hamburg. Erinnerungen an die Landerkampfe der F.I.D.E. 1930
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Die Schacholympiade von Hamburg. Erinnerungen an die Landerkampfe der F.I.D.E. 1930

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Author: Chalupetzky, Ferenc (1886-1951) and László Tóth from the the club library of Studenterforeningens Skakklub

Year: 1931

Publisher: Verlag Magyar Sakkvilag

Place: Kecskemét

Description:

156+[3 ad] pages with plates, diagrams and tables. Small octavo (7 1/4" x 5 1/4") bound brown cloth with black label with gilt lettering to spine. Introductions by Dr A Rueb, J Dimer, A Brinckmann and Dr A Vajda. (Bibliotheca van der Linde-Niemeijeriana: 5438) First edition.

Germany undertook the organization of the 3rd Olympiad in 1930 and Hamburg was chosen as the venue to celebrate the centenary of the Hamburg Chess Club. The participating countries, whose number had increased to eighteen, had prepared themselves thoroughly in the two years since the last Olympiad and most of them were represented by their best players. To judge from the list of competitors at the start, the Polish team seemed to have te best prospects. In 1929 Rubinstein, their first board, had taken part in tournament with a success that was reminiscent of his glorious day, while Tartakower too was at the top of his form. Beside the, Przepiorka, Makarczyk and Frydman all had good reputations. Hungary, winners of the two previous Olympiads were led by Maroczy, but Dr Nagy's place was taken by Takacs. The United States team, with Marshall and Kashdan in it, was consider to have excellent chances, while the Czech, Austrian, German and Dutch sides could expect of finish well up the field, thanks to their new players. The play of Sultan Khan, of India, for the English team and World Champion. Dr Alekhine, on top board for France, was awaited with great interest. By the luck of the draw the two favorites came up against each other in the first round. The outcome was tragic for Hungary, for Maroczy went wrong in a sharp position and his defeat brought the rest down. Poland won 3 1/2 - 1/2. The Hungarians refused to be depressed. They pushed on steadily and soon got into the leading group. This comprised some six to eight teams all jostling for the lead and which, in the period from the 5th to 10th rounds, there were rarely separated by more than 1/2 points. Then Czechoslovakia and the United States suddenly broke away from the field and led for four rounds, but they could not keep it up. The Czechs gradually fell back and the Americans were knocked out by losing 4 - 0 to Austria. Meanwhile, Hungary and Poland had fought their way to the front and with a great effort made sure of the first two places in the penultimate round. Hungary had a 1/2 point advantage at that stage, but it proved to little; while they were losing to Holland in the last round, the Poles scored an easy victory against the tail enders, Finland and thus finished 1 1/2 points ahead. Poland deserved to win. Rubinstein had the best record of all the competitors (in making his 100% score, Alekhine played only nine games and they were against weaker opponents). The overall percentage achieved by the Hungarian team was higher than in London and The Hague, yet it was still insufficient for first place. Maroczy and Takacs had found the exhausting finish too much of a strain, but Havasi's performance was the best of his long Olympiad career. Germany's high placing was due to the steadiness of the whole team, while Austria owed many valuable points to Eliskases, the youngest player in the tournament, and Lokvenc. There was young and promising master in each of the next few teams. Kashdan attracted special attention, since his style was similar to that of Lasker when young. The veteran Marshall, however, was by no means overshadowed. Completing the top half were the Dutch, who were highly respected for their excellent results against the teams above them, the English and the Swedes. Rubinstein, Havasi and Flohr won the prizes for the best individual scores. The first two, together with Alekhine and Winter, went through the tournament undefeated.

Condition:

Spine ends and edges rubbed else a very good copy.