Siegen Chess Olympiad, September 5th to September 26th 1970
Siegen Chess Olympiad, September 5th to September 26th 1970
Siegen Chess Olympiad, September 5th to September 26th 1970
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Siegen Chess Olympiad, September 5th to September 26th 1970

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Author: Keene, Raymond Dennis (1948- ) and David Neil Laurence Levy

Year: 1970

Publisher: Chess Ltd

Place: Sutton Coldfield

Description:

249+[3 ad] pages with diagrams, photographs, tables, facsimiles and index. Octavo (8 1/2" x 5 3/4") bound in original publisher's blue cloth with gilt lettering to spine. Chess for Modern Times Series. (Lusis: 1570) First edition.

The 19th Chess Olympiad, comprising an open team tournament as well as the annual FIDE congress, took place between September 5 and 27, 1970, in Siegen, West Germany. Held at the Siegerland Hall venue, a total of 64 nations applied to enter the tournament. Unfortunately, space constraints and FIDE's intended model format meant that only 60 could be accommodated. It was then found that four teams were to have their applications rejected on the grounds that they had missed the deadline. These four teams were: Argentina, France, Ecuador, and Venezuela. When Panama withdrew their application, Argentina took their place. The tournament was run as a two-stage round-robin. Six preliminary groups of 10 teams each determined the composition of five Finals of 12 teams each, with the top two from each group ending up in Final A etc. Several unsatisfactory aspects of this system were voiced, however, and they manifested themselves in a variety of ways. The teams competed for the Hamilton-Russell Cup. Matches were scored by game points, with match points being used in the event of a tie-break. The Chief Referee was International Arbiter Harry de Graaf. A total of 360 players took part, including 35 grandmasters and 66 international masters. The tournament was very well attended by the public, particularly on the day that current World Champion Boris Spassky played future champion Bobby Fischer, with an estimated 3000 spectators turning up (Spassky won). The Soviet team with six Grandmasters, led by world champion Boris Spassky, lived up to expectations and won their tenth consecutive gold medal, although only by a single point, with Hungary and Yugoslavia taking the silver and bronze, respectively. The United States captured fourth place out of the medals.

Condition:

Corners bumped, points, spine ends and edges rubbed else a very good copy.