Die Kunst im Schachspiel ein Meister zu Werden: Das ist: ein neuer Unterricht, wie man in kurzem dieses so edle und beliebte Spiel nach seiner Vollkommenheit erlernen k�nne. Gewiesen nach den neuesten Mustern des ber�hmten und itztlebenden grossen Sch

Author: Philidor, Francois Danican (1726-1795)

Publisher: Konig Verlag

Location: Strasburg

Year: 1754

$1,250.00


Description:

351+[errata] pages with fold out diagram. Duodecimo (6 3/4" x 4 1/4") bound in full leather with gilt lettering to spine and front cover. (Bibliotheca van der Linde-Niemeijeriana:476) First German edition.

Francois-Andre Danican Philidor (September 7, 1726-August 31, 1795), often referred to as Andre Danican Philidor during his lifetime, was a French composer and chess player. He contributed to the early development of the opera comique. He was also regarded as the best chess player of his age; his book Analyse du jeu des echecs was considered a standard chess manual for at least a century, and a well-known chess opening and a checkmate method are both named after him. Philidor started playing regularly around 1740 at the chess Mecca of France, the Cafe de la Regence. It was also there that he famously played with a friend from 'New England', Mr. Benjamin Franklin. The best player in France at the time, Legall de Kermeur, taught him. At first, Legall could give Philidor rook odds, but in only three years, Philidor was his equal, and then surpassed him. Philidor visited England in 1747 and decisively beat the Syrian Phillip Stamma in a match +8 =1 −1, despite the fact Philidor let Stamma have White in every game, and scored all draws as wins for Stamma. The same year, Philidor played many games with another strong player, Sir Abraham Janssen, who was then the best player in England, and with the exception of M. de Legalle, probably the best player Philidor ever encountered. He could win on an average one game in four off Philidor, at even terms; and Philidor himself declared that he could only give to Janssen the pawn for the move. In 1754, Philidor returned to France, after nine years of absence spent mostly in Holland and England. He was now a much stronger player, having successfully played with opponents of the calibre of Philip Stamma and Abraham Janssen, but, as G. Allen reports in The life of Philidor, it was not until his match with de Legal in 1755 that he can be considered the strongest player in the world. When Philidor left Paris, in 1745, although he had for some time been playing even games with M. de Legal... he had not ceased to recognize his old master as still his master and superior. But nine years of practice, with a great variety of players, had authorized him to look for neither superior nor equal; and when, in 1755, a match was arranged between the pupil and his master, who was still at the height of his strength, the result placed the crown firmly and indisputably upon the head of Philidor. In 1749, Philidor published his famous book Analyse du jeu des echecs. He printed a second edition in 1777, and a third edition in 1790. The book was such an advance in chess knowledge that by 1871, it had gone through about 70 editions, and had been translated into English, German, Russian and Italian. In it, Philidor analyzed nine different types of game openings. Most of the openings of Philidor are designed to strengthen and establish a strong defensive center using pawns. He is the first one to realize the new role of the pawn in the chess game; and his most famous advice was the saying "The pawns are the soul of chess."

Condition:

Corners gently bumped, modern leather binding, some foxing, previous owner's name to title else a very good copy.