Nouveau traité du jeu des échecs

Author: la Bourdonnais, Charles Mahe de (1797-1840)

Publisher: Au Cafe de la Regence

Location: Paris

Year: 1833

$1,000.00


Description:

2 parts bound in one. iv+167 with title chess diagram; 204+[3] with diagrams and errata. Octavo (8 1/4" 5 1/4") bound in marbled boards. (Bibliotheca Van der Linde-Niemeijeriana: 673) First edition.

Louis-Charles Mahe de la Bourdonnais was born into a noble family on Reunion Island, then called Bourbon Island, in the Indian Ocean. He was sent to Paris where he attended the Henry IV College and learned to play chess in 1814. From 1818 onwards he played seven days a week at the Caf� de la Regence, where he had his own table. In 1821 he defeated Alexandre Deschapelles and John Cochrane and in 1823 he defeated Lewis in London. In 1825 he visited England again and there he married Eliza Waller Gordon. In 1831 he lost the money that he had inherited from his father in a land speculation in Saint-Malo. From then chess was his only source of income. In 1833 he published Nouveau Traite du Jeux des Echecs and in 1834 he played a match against Alexander MacDonnell. The match consisted of six parts and La Bourdonnais. They didn't speak each others language and could only say 'check' to one another. MacDonnell took far more time to make his moves and in between them La Bourdonnais played quick chess against other players to earn some extra money. During the sixth and last part La Bourdonnais was recalled to France on urgent business matters and MacDonnell died before the match could be resumed. In 1836 he became one of the editors of the first chess magazine, La Palamede. In 1838 he suffered a stroke and then from dropsy. Things went downward from then. He had to sell his books, furniture and clothes and in 1840 he returned to London where he was employed at Simpson's Divan. He died in December of that year and George Walker, the organizer of his match against MacDonnell, paid for his burial.

Condition:

Tape to spine, edges chipped and rubbed, some foxing else a good copy.