Alexander Alekhine's Chess Games, 1902-1946: 2543 Games of the Former World Champion, Many Annotated by Alekhine with 1868 diagrams fully Indexed

Author: Skinner, Leonard M and Robert G P Verhoeven

Publisher: McFarland & Company, Inc

Location: Jefferson, NC

Year: 1998

$75.00


Description:

xv+807 pages with frontispiece portrait, diagrams, illustrations, plates, tables, figures, bibliography and indices. Small folio (11 1/4" x 8 3/4") bound in maroon cloth with gilt lettering to spine and covers. Foreword by Alex A Aljechin. First edition.

This is by a large degree the most comprehensive accounting of the games of this brilliant chess player. Presented are 2,543 of Alekhine’s games, in an exhaustive catalog that is the result of many years of digging—an effort unparalleled in the history of chess game collections. Many of the games are annotated by Alekhine and 1,868 diagrams appear overall. The book includes games from his earliest correspondence tournaments in 1902 through his final match with Francisco Lupi at Estoril, Portugal, in January 1946.

Alexander Alekhine was a Russian and French chess player and the fourth World Chess Champion. He is widely considered to be one of the greatest chess players of all time. By the age of 22, Alekhine was already among the strongest chess players in the world. During the 1920s, he won most of the tournaments in which he played. In 1921, Alekhine left Soviet Russia and emigrated to France, which he represented after 1925. In 1927, he became the fourth World Chess Champion by defeating José Raúl Capablanca.
In the early 1930s, Alekhine dominated tournament play and won two top-class tournaments by large margins. He also played first board for France in five Chess Olympiads, winning individual prizes in each (four medals and a brilliancy prize). Alekhine offered Capablanca a rematch on the same demanding terms that Capablanca had set for him, and negotiations dragged on for years without making much progress. Meanwhile, Alekhine defended his title with ease against Efim Bogoljubov in 1929 and 1934. He was defeated by Max Euwe in 1935, but regained his crown in the 1937 rematch. His tournament record, however, remained uneven, and rising young stars like Paul Keres, Reuben Fine, and Mikhail Botvinnik threatened his title. Negotiations for a title match with Keres or Botvinnik were halted by the outbreak of World War II in Europe in 1939. Negotiations with Botvinnik for a world title match were proceeding in 1946 when Alekhine died in Portugal, in unclear circumstances. Alekhine is the only World Chess Champion to have died while holding the title. Alekhine is known for his fierce and imaginative attacking style, combined with great positional and endgame skill. He is highly regarded as a chess writer and theoretician, having produced innovations in a wide range of chess openings and having given his name to Alekhine's Defence and several other opening variations. He also composed some endgame studies. (Wikipedia).

Condition:

A near fine copy issued without jacket.